EUROPEAN NEWS



Somewhere in London

2013-01-24

At the time France and Germany were celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Treaty of Paris (see next item), British Prime Minister David Cameron spoke somewhere in London on the U.K. and the European Union. The coincidence was striking. On 22 January 1963 French President Charles de Gaulle and West-German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, solemnly signed their treaty, barely a week after de Gaulle said NO to British entry into the European Communities. David Cameron`s views on Europe are not very different from those of his predecessor Macmillan, when asked about his views on the Schuman Plan in 1950: "Our people are not going to hand to any supranational authority the right to close down our pits or steelworks." The principal difference between them is, that the latter decided not to join the ECSC, whereas the former speaks on behalf of EU member state Britain after forty years of troublesome membership. How much trouble various British governments made in those forty years can be read in Part II, chapters 1, 2, 4 and 5 of my latest book on European Unification. Prime Minister Cameron, apparently, has a very short memory and no ability to learn from history. Does he know what happened to the 1974 British demand for renegotiation? Or how his predecessor Margareth Thatcher blocked decision-making for years, just because she wanted her money back? Or John Major who in 1991 arranged for all kinds of opt-outs for Britain and thereby definitely destroyed agreement on a European vision for the future of European unification? As in 1950, Cameron today still does not understand what the EU is about. He wants no more than the Internal Market and erroneously thinks that securing prosperity now is the overriding purpose. His fellow British citizen, Norman Davies knows better, where he wrote that the EU, "if it continues to give priority to economic and monetary matters, is heading nowhere." Cameron`s request for another round of renegotiations is not going to lead anywhere, not even under threat of the announced referendum. The idea of an in/out referendum is absurd; not without reason postponed to some time in 2017. One can only hope for another government and/or more wisdom among the majority of British voters.


Download Document



Back
Frans A.M. Alting von Geusau

Email

  • Cultural Diplomacy: Waging war by other means?
  • Order Book
  • The Illusions of Détente,
  • Order Book
  • Western Cooperation
  • Order Book
  • Sporen van de Twintigste Eeuw
  • Order Book
  • European Unification into the twenty first Century...
  • Order Book
  • De geest van Christus leeft in Europa
  • Order Book
  • Neither Justice nor Order
  • Order Book

Neither Justice nor Order

Footprints of the 20th Century - Third Edition

Description

This fifth and final volume offers a critical assessment of the state of the law of nations. In the twenty first century the world needs true global law anchored in the dignity of the human person rather than weak international law built on the interests of major sovereign states.

The Illusions of Detente

Footprints of the 20th Century - Third Edition

Description

Since 1989, we refer to the whole post-war period as the “Cold War Era”. Such was not the case in 1968. At the time, the Cold War – in our perception – was behind us. We no longer felt to be in the midst of it. Europeans on the Western side of the Iron Curtain0 felt relatively at ease with Europe’s division. The era of Détente as we called it, was0 considered to be a fairly stable and long-lasting political condition, even after Soviet tanks crushed Dubcek’s socialism with a human face in Pragu